Catching up – or chopping down.

“Useful for breaking up those clods of earth that do not break down in the frost as promised by lying garden writers. Or bashing the soil off the rootball of something you’ve dug up and want to dispose of. That sort of thing…”

Playing with Plants

“We went off to the local Builder’s Merchant and ordered some scaffolding boards, and the internet provided us with some threaded rods and nuts.”

Reflections

“I love it when it’s faded a little and I add a refresher dose. Gradually a darker inky black spreads across the pool, reviving and restoring the drama all over again.

Anne at Hay Festival with Tim Richardson

This is a very short post. Or a long one if you click and listen. I couldn't resist giving you the chance to hear it, just having come across it. It's a recording of Tim Richardson interviewing me at Hay Festival when The Bad Tempered Gardener had just come out. Here...

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Finished!

  On to the final stages - Caitriona arrives. Here is a small sample of the work she did last time for us: So, work begins on this new project, from the bottom... and starts in red crayon - Then the carving begins..(tap tap tap tap...) Caitriona reaches the top and...

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The Installation of The Stone.

Bet you could hardly wait for this. For too long we looked at The Stone in the car park and wondered if it would ever find its way anywhere else. I attempted to contact landscapers (just their kind of thing, you'd think, wouldn't you?) but no-one was even slightly...

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The Stone. The first part.

I've spent a lot of time researching our predecessors at the Veddw, especially the squatters.  They are the first actual inhabitants of our particular bit of land that we know about and were the builders of the turf and mud hut, which was followed by the cottage which...

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The Hampton Court Chop: stake out.

I hate staking plants. It looks ugly, especially early on in the year. And it's hard work (always best avoided). So I have one or two tricks to save me the bother. One is stuffing plants so tight together that they are self supporting. This works well, especially if...

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A Sculpture Garden in the Wye Valley

  Yesterday we managed to wangle ourselves a cream tea, with ginger cake, with some good friends of ours, Elsa and Adrian Wood, at the Nurtons - home to their daughter, Gemma Wood's Sculpture Garden. Not to be confused with Wyndcliffe Court Sculpture Garden. I know -...

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They didn’t ALL die!

Some of you kind people will remember my distress last year when my euphorbias, the biggest joy (well, maybe) of Veddw in May, started dying last summer. I thought I'd lost the lot. See here. Then come springa few began to reappear. And now some of them are back! And...

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We Launch a Book!

Well, you get asked to write a book, you write it, it gets published and the next thing is - you have a book launch, right? So we did. We launched 'Outwitting Squirrels'  on the river Wye at Symmonds Yat. We had to begin by making a boat to launch it in - this was...

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Sorted?

In 2012 Rory Stuart published 'What Are Gardens For?' and in it he offered a critique of Veddw. Amongst other things (get the book..) he said: 'The avenue in the meadow should lead somewhere, perhaps through a gate or an arch into the shade of the Cotoneaster Walk'. I...

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Painful truths about Camellias

It being the season, and garden writers needing to endlessly provide reading material, I recently read a piece in praise of camellias. Understandable - they are quite attractive flowers with a good shiny evergreen leaf. Hmm. And people go long distances to visit them...

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August at Veddw

Someone, thinking of visiting, recently asked me what is in flower at Veddw in August. So, my apologies to all those of you who would like words here, and to all those who are spring focused and can't bear to imagine August right now: here are a selection of August...

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Is winter interest interesting?

The term ‘interest’ in relation to gardens has irritated me for years. Partly because the use of the word seems totally wrong and I’ve found it hard to say why. I think it’s actually because interest (apart from when applied to money) implies thinking, or curiosity –...

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How do we define ‘gardeners’? by Anne Wareham

This piece was originally published in 'The Garden' in May 2013. I struggled for a long time to accurately define what I think I am (this is not an invitation to enlighten me, thanks...) and I think this nails it. For me, and presumably for many other...

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Not all Glooom

Yes, I've been neglecting anyone who is kind enough to follow this blog. And right now I'm somewhat out of words, having been frantically book writing in every spare moment since June...words words words.. So, I'm cheating. Some pictures of Veddw in November. (though...

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Thinkingardens Supper

My apologies for those who want words - this is a post principally for the interest of those who came to the thinkingardens supper at Veddw, to discuss beauty and gardens. And much else besides. And eat cake....drink a little... #   .. and there are no pictures of the...

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